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Family Planning

Women and Girls

Securing women's right to voluntary, high-quality family planning dramatically improves the health and well-being of women and their children. It also avoids emissions.

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Rank and results by 2050 #7

Family Planning

Reduced CO2: 60 gigatons
What do these numbers mean?

TOTAL CO2-EQ REDUCTION (GT)

Total CO2-equivalent reduction in atmospheric greenhouse gases by 2050 (gigatons)

NET COST (billions US $)

Net cost to implement

SAVINGS (billions US $)

Net savings by 2050

Impact:

Increased adoption of reproductive healthcare and family planning is an essential component to achieve the United Nations’ 2015 medium global population projection of 9.7 billion people by 2050. If investment in family planning, particularly in low-income countries, does not materialize, the world’s population could come closer to the high projection, adding another 1 billion people to the planet. We model the impact of this solution based on the difference in how much energy, building space, food, waste, and transportation would be used in a world with little to no investment in family planning, compared to one in which the projection of 9.7 billion is realized. The resulting emissions reductions could be 119.2 gigatons of carbon dioxide, at an average annual cost of $10.77 per user in low-income countries. Because educating girls has an important impact on the use of family planning, we allocate 50 percent of the total potential emissions reductions to each solution—59.6 gigatons a piece.

Vs

Recycled Paper

Materials

Half of paper is used once and then trashed. Recycling makes paper's journey circular, rather than a straight line from logging to landfill, which reduces emissions.

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Rank and results by 2050 #70

Recycled Paper

Reduced CO2: 1 gigatons
Net cost (Billions US$): $573.48
What do these numbers mean?

TOTAL CO2-EQ REDUCTION (GT)

Total CO2-equivalent reduction in atmospheric greenhouse gases by 2050 (gigatons)

NET COST (billions US $)

Net cost to implement

SAVINGS (billions US $)

Net savings by 2050

Impact:

Over thirty years, recycled paper can deliver .9 gigatons of carbon dioxide emissions reductions. Two key assumptions inform that conclusion: (1) recycled paper produces about 25 percent fewer total emissions than conventional paper, and (2) the percentage of recycled paper being used to produce paper would rise from 55 percent to 75 percent by 2050. Although increasing recycled paper content uses more electricity, the emissions related to harvesting and processing — and the total emissions from pulping and manufacturing — are higher for paper using virgin wood feedstock. The emissions reductions for this solution do not include carbon sequestration from standing trees that would not be harvested if the use of recycled paper grows.

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