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Biochar

Food

Biochar results from slowly baking biomass in the absence of oxygen. Retaining most of the feedstock's carbon, biochar can be buried for sequestration, while enriching soil.

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Rank and results by 2050 #72

Biochar

Reduced CO2: 1 gigatons
What do these numbers mean?

TOTAL CO2-EQ REDUCTION (GT)

Total CO2-equivalent reduction in atmospheric greenhouse gases by 2050 (gigatons)

NET COST (billions US $)

Net cost to implement

SAVINGS (billions US $)

Net savings by 2050

Impact:

Biochar can produce 0.8 gigatons of carbon dioxide emissions reductions by 2050. This analysis draws on total lifecycle assessments of the many ways biochar prevents and sequesters greenhouse gases, while assuming the nascent biochar industry is limited by the availability of global biomass feedstocks.

Vs

Methane Digesters (Large)

Electricity Generation

Industrial-scale anaerobic digesters control decomposition of organic waste, and thus its methane emissions. They also produce biogas, an energy source, and digestate, a nutrient-rich fertilizer.

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Rank and results by 2050 #30

Methane Digesters (Large)

Reduced CO2: 8 gigatons
Net cost (Billions US$): $201.41
Net operational savings: $148.83 billion
What do these numbers mean?

TOTAL CO2-EQ REDUCTION (GT)

Total CO2-equivalent reduction in atmospheric greenhouse gases by 2050 (gigatons)

NET COST (billions US $)

Net cost to implement

SAVINGS (billions US $)

Net savings by 2050

Impact:

We project that by 2050, large digesters can grow to 69.8 gigawatts of installed capacity, resulting in 8.4 gigatons of carbon dioxide emissions avoided at a cost of $201.4 billion. If you couple this impact with that of small methane digesters, the cumulative result is 10.3 gigatons of carbon dioxide emissions avoided.

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