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Perennial Biomass

Land Use

Using perennial bioenergy crops (e.g., switchgrass, silver grass, willow, eucalyptus) rather than annuals (e.g., corn) reduces emissions and raises carbon sequestration in soil.

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Rank and results by 2050 #51

Perennial Biomass

Reduced CO2: 3 gigatons
Net cost (Billions US$): $77.94
Net operational savings: $541.89 billion
What do these numbers mean?

TOTAL CO2-EQ REDUCTION (GT)

Total CO2-equivalent reduction in atmospheric greenhouse gases by 2050 (gigatons)

NET COST (billions US $)

Net cost to implement

SAVINGS (billions US $)

Net savings by 2050

Impact:

Perennial bioenergy crops provide the feedstock for biomass energy generation, making those emissions reductions possible. They also can generate their own climate impact of 3.3 gigatons of carbon dioxide by 2050, as they replace annual feedstocks and sequester more soil carbon. Our analysis assumes a rise from .5 million acres currently to 143 million acres by 2050. The cultivation of perennials is costlier than annuals, but returns over thirty years could be $542 billion.

Vs

Peatlands

Land Use

Although peatlands cover just 3 percent of the earth's land area, they are second only to oceans in the amount of carbon they store.

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Rank and results by 2050 #13

Peatlands

Reduced CO2: 22 gigatons
What do these numbers mean?

TOTAL CO2-EQ REDUCTION (GT)

Total CO2-equivalent reduction in atmospheric greenhouse gases by 2050 (gigatons)

NET COST (billions US $)

Net cost to implement

SAVINGS (billions US $)

Net savings by 2050

Impact:

If the total protected area of peatlands increases from 7.9 million acres to 608 million acres by 2050, or 67 percent of all currently intact peatlands, 21.6 gigatons of carbon dioxide emissions can be avoided. At 608 million acres, peatlands would hold a protected stock of 336 gigatons of carbon, or roughly 1,230 gigtons of carbon dioxide if released into the atmosphere. Though peatlands comprise only 3 percent of global land area, they are the most organic-rich soils; their degradation would release an enormous amount of carbon. Financials are not projected as they are not incurred at the landholder level.

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